best tools for knife sharpening
The Lansky Quick Edge is priced at only $7.99. Is it worth the purchase? (Lansky photo)

Lansky’s Quick Edge knife sharpener is the ticket for a fast track to a sharp edge.

The Quick Edge works like most other pull-through-type sharpeners. It consists of a sturdy plastic handle with a D-guard, and there is a pair of tungsten-carbide cutters in the sharpener’s head set at a pre-set angle of 20 degrees.

How It Works

how to sharpen a knife
(Lansky image)

The pull-through sharpener works on the principle of scraping a tiny amount of steel from the edge to reconfigure it to a crisp “V” shape. Pull-through sharpeners require very little skill to master—just pull the sharpener head over the entire cutting edge a few times and you’ve got a sharp knife. The Quick Edge is fast, convenient and safe, too, thanks to the D-guard that prevents accidental cuts during sharpening.

The handle’s understated, user-friendly finger grooves enhance grip, and the D-guard is large enough to accommodate a gloved hand comfortably and securely.

A thumb rest on the handle enables you to use your thumb to aid in providing downward pressure during sharpening.

Using the Quick Edge

lansky knife sharpening
Place the V-shaped carbide sharpening element over the cutting edge at the tang and pull toward the blade tip. Repeat until you obtain a sharp edge. The knife is the Kershaw Groove. (Dexter Ewing photo)

Place the knife you want to sharpen edge up on a sturdy work surface. Firmly grip the knife’s handle with one hand and, with the other hand, place the Quick Edge cutting head down on the cutting edge at the area closest to the tang.

With light to moderate pressure, drag the sharpener over the edge in one motion, going toward the blade tip. Once you reach the tip, replace the sharpener where you started and repeat the process several times until you have a sharp edge.

Due to how pull-through sharpeners work—not just the Quick Edge but most pull-through models—I caution against using them with high-quality using knives, including customs. However, if you need a good, serviceable edge for inexpensive working or hunting knives, the Quick Edge is for you.

For instance, if you do a lot of machete work, the Quick Edge should be your cup of tea. When the edge gets dull, sharpen it with a series of pulls and you can go right back to work. The edge the Quick Edge creates will not be as sharp or uniform as one provided by any of Lansky’s clamp-style sharpening kits—hence my recommendation against using the Quick Edge on high-quality cutlery.

Nonetheless, the pull-through model provides a nice, serviceable edge for cutting/chopping outdoor knives that see a lot of use and, perhaps, abuse.

Stored in a tackle box or toolbox, the Quick Edge is ideal for fast stock removal in the field and works best with low- to mid-grade blade steels.

Learn More About Knife Maintenance

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