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Knifemaking

Knifemaking is the building of a knife, which includes the blade, handle and other accouterments. Blades are made by either removing metal from a steel blank via a grinder – known as stock removal – and the forging to shape of hot steel into a blade in the process known as bladesmithing. Other parts, including bolsters, guards, pommels, etc., are needed to complete the finished knife.

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Wally Hayes tsuba

Tsuba Time: Make a Guard for a Japanese Sword

When it comes to making Japanese swords, the "tsuba" is also known as the "guard." Here’s how to make one, with instruction from American Bladesmith Society master smith Wally Hayes.
what is the best blade grind

What’s the Best Kind of Knife Grind?

The most popular knife grinds today are hollow, flat and convex. Which one is the best overall? And does edge geometry matter more than heat treating? A few renowned knifemakers give their opinions.

The Hamon: What, Where, Why and How

To those who appreciate the tempered steel of a Japanese sword, the hamon is visual evidence of the maker’s effort to produce the finest blade work.

91-Year-Old Knifemaker Murray Sterling is Still Going Strong

Murray Sterling has seen a lot and done a lot in his 91 years on this earth. For the past 30, he’s made a name for himself as a custom knifemaker. When approached about...

8 Well-Made Knife Guards

Constantly on the lookout for something that will make their knives better and stand out at the same time, many of today’s custom makers don’t hesitate to jazz up the guard. And why not? A...

5 Leading Sharpening Rods

5 LEADING SHARPENING RODS TAKE THE AUTHOR’S SHARP TEST The sharpening rod is perhaps the No. 1 kitchen knife accessory in many households. Why? Usually 8 to 12 inches long, it is a hardened steel...

Intermediate Forging: Blending the Old with the New

BY LIN RHEA ABS MASTER SMITH Blending the old with the new sometimes can yield notable results. It’s been said there’s nothing new under the sun. I might add that new ideas in knifemaking are rare....
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