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Msg Kim Breed (ret.)

Civivi Cogent Review: How Versatile Is This Flipper?

The Cogent Flipper Folder From Civivi Is Ready To Cut Through Pretty Much Anything

The Cogent button-lock folder from Civivi is well put together. It has a great feel and a classy blackened stainless steel damascus blade. 

Civivi uses 10Cr15CoMoV and 9Cr18MoV stainless steels in the damascus mix. The blade has a full flat grind designed to slim the edge geometry down for efficient slicing.

Testing The Civivi Cogent

Civivi Cogent skiving leather
Skiving 6-ounce leather was no problem as the Cogent did the job aggressively and noisily—the author easily could hear the crunch on each skive.

First up on the test agenda: 20-pound bond copy paper. The Cogent zipped through it without hesitation. The blade was super smooth during slicing. I used a push cut for a full slice. The knife most definitely has a fine edge.

Staying with a push cut, I used the Cogent to effortlessly slice single-walled cardboard to shreds. The edge never stalled in dispatching the medium. Man, this thing is wicked sharp! There was no twisting of cuts, just straight slices. In fact, it sliced so quickly I had to really watch my fingers to avoid cutting them.

I took it up a notch by slicing plastic board. It was like there was no variation at all in the speed and control of cutting. The only difference was the absence of the zipping noise emitted by the cutting of the cardboard. It was nice, quiet slicing with no hang ups.

There was some 6-ounce leather on the bench for skiving. I decided to slice just a part of it up first. Talk about aggressive cutting! I could easily hear the crunching from every skive. The Cogent sounded like it was actually taking a bite out of the leather—which I guess it was. I did some skiving on another piece of leather with similar results. This knife is a wicked sharp cutter.

Wood & Rope

Civivi Cogent cutting rope
The Cogent worked its way to 214 crunching cuts on the 3/8-inch rope before the author got tired and quit.

It was time for some firestick making. Utilizing the fine edge, I whittled some curly-cues in a pine stick. I did some very fine curly-cues and some thicker ones. The Cogent was excellent controlling curly-cue thickness. The thumb notches were very comfortable during the deeper bites. The handle was quite comfy.

For some splitting action to test the lockup, I batonned the Cogent into a half-inch-thick board. It split the wood very quickly with no smears on the blade. The button lock stayed at 100 percent lockup. No wiggle here!

The last challenge was the 3/8-inch sisal rope. The Cogent worked its way to 214 crunching cuts before I got tired. The edge would still shave hair from my arm*. The blade boasts excellent heat treatment. I didn’t find one hot spot on the handle and the knife was very comfortable for heavy cutting.

Civivi Cogent: Final Thoughts

I would carry this knife every day. It holds a sharp edge longer than most. The second-best thing is the comfortable handle. It is made for using. The Cogent is an excellent folder. I’d maybe add more handle color options. I love everything else.

*Editor’s note: BLADE® does not recommend shaving arm hair to test blade cutting ability. It can result in injury or worse.

Civivi Cogent Knife Specs

Blade length: 3.47”
Blade material: Blackened stainless damascus
Blade thickness at the thickest: 1/8 of an inch at ricasso and tapers to the tip
Rockwell hardness: 58-60 HRC
Handle: Green Micarta®
Liners: Stainless steel
Opening: Flipper
Lock: Manual button lock
Knife to know: Open-handle construction for easy cleaning; handle textured; thumb notches on base of blade spine
Country of origin: China
Weight: 4 ounces
Closed length: 4.25 inches
MSRP: $115

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TILI Ultralight Review: How Good Is This Small Fixed Blade?

The TILI Ultralight By Origin Handcrafted Goods Might Be Small But It Packs One Heck Of A Bite.

The TILI Ultralight by Origin Handcrafted Goods is a small fixed blade that can fit in your pocket like a pocketknife with no need to figure out how to open the blade or disengage a safety. Pull it clear of the pocket sheath and you’re ready to cut. Among the things I love about smaller fixed blades is that people don’t give you the evil stink eye when you use the knives in public.

Testing The Ultralight 

TILI Ultralight cutting paper
The TILI Ultralight handled slicing copy paper with ease.

I started with a simple paper slice using 20-pound bond copy paper. The TILI sliced very smoothly using both a draw cut and a push cut. The knife was controllable in making the width of the slices—I just had to move my fingers out of the way fast.

Next up: single-walled cardboard. The handle shape of the TILI Ultralight made for extremely controllable slices in the cardboard as well. I could hear the aggressive edge as it sliced. The edge is very fine and ideal for such a job.

Plastic board was next. There was a little more blade grab in this medium as the TILI’s blade bevel is short—around 3/8 of an inch. The full thickness of the blade engaged the plastic board quickly. It still made quick, clean cuts as fast as I could move my fingers.

The little fixed blade produced beautiful curly-cues in half-inch pine, producing nice, clean cuts. It was easy to control the depth and thickness of the curly-cues. The TILI Ultralight is great for making fire sticks and a handy little knife to put in a pack. It would be excellent at cleaning small game.

Slicing Through Challenges

TILI Ultralight cutting pine knott
The author drove the edge through a pine knot twice. He felt some micro chipping on the edge but it still cut great.

Skiving leather strips was next on the menu. The blade made a forceful crunching sound as it parted the 8-ounce leather. The small blade was controllable in making the slices thin. It favored skiving with the tip more than with the blade’s belly. This is a very sharp knife!

To push the fine edge more, I switched to 3/8-inch sisal rope. The TILI crunched to 125 cuts before my hand said “enough!” It’s hard to keep the pressure on a thin knife without your hand getting sore somewhere. The edge was still sharp and ready for more.

I switched to half-inch pine for some baton practice. The knife was easy to hold onto and it split the wood great. I even drove the edge through a knot twice. I felt some micro chipping on the edge but it still cut great. The steel might be a point too hard on the Rockwell hardness scale for heavy work. Keep the use to slicing and you won’t have any issues.

The TILI comes with a leather pouch sheath to protect the blade. I would put stainless steel pins in the holes at the end of the sheath to prevent accidental penetration as this knife is very pointy and razor sharp.

Bottom line: The TILI Ultralight is a handy knife that’s a perfect little backup blade for all-around use.

Changes I’d Make To The TILI Ultralight

I would add a couple of thumb notches on the blade and extra protection on the tip of the sheath to prevent blade penetration. (EDITOR’S NOTE: The latter is especially crucial if you carry the knife sheathed in your pocket.)

TILI Ultralight Specs

Blade Length: 2.38 inches
Blade Material: 1095 carbon steel
Blade Grind: Hollow
Heat Treat: Differentially Hardened with Hamon
Handle: Skeletonized Steel with hole for included leather lanyard
Weight: 2 ounces
Overall Length: 2.75 inches
Sheath: Black Veggie Tanned Leather
Weight with Sheath: 3 ounces
MSRP: $125

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Oknife Beagle Review: Does This Folder Pass Muster?

High-Quality Folder Or Cheap Piece Of Metal? The Beagle From Oknife Gets Put Through Its Paces To Figure It Out.

The Beagle linerlock folder from Oknife feels good in the hand and rides quite well in a pants pocket. Action is very smooth with a positive lockup. When you close the knife, the detent ball grabs the harpoon-pattern blade securely. Balance is excellent. As for cutting performance, let’s see.

Edge Test

OKNIFE BEAGLE cutting bone
The Beagle whacked 22 times into the bone before breaking it. Afterward, the author detected a very small nick in the edge. Not bad at all!

First up: a check of the factory edge with a slice of 20-pound bond copy paper. Via a pull cut, the Beagle sliced very clean with no snagging. Cuts were controllable and smooth. 

Double-walled cardboard provided the next test medium. The blade cut neat and fluidly with a minimum of grab by the cardboard. The Beagle worked better using a push rather than a pull cut. I felt no snagging in the process. Control was a tad wobbly as more pressure was needed to part the thick cardboard.

Heavy-Duty Cutting With The Oknife Beagle

OKNIFE BEAGLE skiving leather
The folder made very fine slices and emitted a nice crunching sound during the skiving. The author used the blade belly mostly to keep the leather together instead of in a pile of pieces.

Plastic board was next. The Beagle cut effortlessly with hardly any wobble. The folder was controllable during the test with only a few zigs in the plastic board. I exerted medium pressure with a push cut.

I used quick, short push cuts in a strip of 8-ounce leather. The Beagle made extremely fine slices and emitted a nice crunching sound. It was very manageable during the skiving. I skived with the belly of the blade mostly to keep the leather together instead of in a pile of pieces.

Beagle Takes On Wood And Sisal Rope

OKNIFE BEAGLE  cutting rope
Working on 3/8-inch sisal rope for the final medium, the edge made it to 98 clean crunching cuts. The author suffered no hotspots or pinches of his hand during all 98 cuts.

Grabbing some pine leftover from my fencing, I commenced to whittle. The 154CM stainless steel blade made some very nice curly-cues. It was controllable for the thin curly-cues and for the deeper bites, too. 

The handle felt good in my hand with no pinch spots during the heavier cuts. The Beagle finished four fire sticks with no issues. Whittling with it was a pleasure.

Next, the edge made it to 98 clean crunching cuts in 3/8-inch sisal rope. After that, the edge slowed down and crunching was not achieved throughout the full cut. My hand suffered no hotspots or pinches during all 98 cuts. The Beagle exhibits outstanding handle contouring.

Oknife Beagle Vs Bone

OKNIFE BEAGLE wood curly-qs
The 154CM stainless steel blade was manageable for the thin curly-cues and the deeper bites, too

For a possible destructive test, I clamped a piece of cow bone in the vise and slammed the edge into it repeatedly. The Beagle whacked 22 times into the bone before breaking it. I detected a very small nick by running a fingernail along the edge. Not bad at all!

Recommendations

I know that for production purposes the liners extend past the handle material. I prefer them to be flush. (Editor’s note: The action is very smooth and fast upon closing—so fast, in fact, take care when closing the blade one-handed that the edge does not nick the skin just below your thumbnail.)

Final Assessment Of The Oknife Beagle

The Beagle is a nice mid-size linerlock with a great handle and excellent edge retention. I would put this one in my pocket for daily carry anytime.

Oknife Beagle Knife Specs

BLADE LENGTH: 3.25 inches
BLADE STEEL: 154CM stainless
BLADE PATTERN: Harpoon
HANDLE: G-10
LOCK: Linerlock
LINERS: Stainless steel
WEIGHT: 3.25 ounces
CLOSED LENGTH: 4 ⅜ inches
EXTRAS: Includes a pouch w/fabric closure that contains a collector coin in a small pocket
MSRP: $79.95

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Hawk Creek Blade E-VAC Review: Cutting-Edge Karambit?

Cutting-Edge Karambit-Style Knife? Or Dull Player? The author searches for his cutting mojo with the Hawk Creek Blade E-VAC.

Though karambits/ringed knives are popular, I am not a fan. New from an equally new knife company—Hawk Creek Blade E-VAC is such a special-use knife, and it requires practice to use it to its full potential.

Normal cutting situations just don’t feel right to me with this knife pattern. I’m sure that with enough repetitions—that’s why they provide a mild steel training blade with the standard version—it would feel normal during most cutting chores.

Hawk Creek Blade E-VAC Edge Test

In slicing 20-pound bond copy paper, when the author got the cutting angle correct he was rewarded with an aggressive slice. When he got the angle wrong, the result was more of a torn slice.
In slicing 20-pound bond copy paper, when the author got the cutting angle correct he was rewarded with an aggressive slice. When he got the angle wrong, the result was more of a torn slice.

In slicing 20-pound bond copy paper, when I got the cutting angle correct I was rewarded with an aggressive slice. When I got the angle wrong, the result was more of a torn slice. I need more practice with the E-VAC to get the hang of it.

E-Vac Heavy-Duty Cutting

The E-VAC worked great skiving 8-ounce leather. The size of the cuts was controllable both in width and depth. Again, using the ulu style of rolling into the medium worked great.
The E-VAC worked great skiving 8-ounce leather. The size of the cuts was controllable both in width and depth. Again, using the ulu style of rolling into the medium worked great.

On single-walled cardboard I did better with a push cut than a pull cut. Again, when I got it right, the knife cut aggressively. On the cardboard, I rolled into the push cut like cutting with an ulu. Using more of the wrist than the hand seemed to work best.

Moving on to some 8-ounce leather, I tried my luck at skiving. The E-VAC worked great. The size of the cuts was controllable both in width and depth. Using the ulu style of rolling into the medium worked great for me.

Batonning The E-Vac

The author batonned the E-VAC through some left-over fencing 1/2-inch thick by 6 inches wide.
The author batonned the E-VAC through some left-over fencing 1/2-inch thick by 6 inches wide.

I batonned the E-VAC through some left-over fencing 1/2 inch thick by 6 inches wide. It was somewhat of a challenge to keep my knuckles out of the path of the dead blow hammer. However, once I got a rhythm going, the knife made short work of the scrap wood. The thin blade split deep on each blow.

E-Vac Smaller Wood Cuts

The E-VAC gave the author some decent curly-cues on the wood pieces left over from the batonning. Depth of cut was quite controllable.
The E-VAC gave the author some decent curly-cues on the wood pieces left over from the batonning. Depth of cut was quite controllable.

Since I had a bunch of smaller pieces of wood, whittling was next. The knife gave me some very nice curly-cues. Depth of cut was quite controllable. Some thin scales or a 550 cord wrap would have given me a better grip for power cuts.

E-Vac Vs Sisal Rope

Once he got a rhythm going, the knife made short work of the scrap wood.
Once he got a rhythm going, the knife made short work of the scrap wood.

I did not do a sisal rope cut as I did not have the time to work on my rope-cutting technique with the E-VAC. Nonetheless, the edge feels plenty sharp enough to work well on rope.

As noted, Hawk Creek Blade provides a non-sharpened, coated mild steel trainer blade to practice your twirls and swirls without cutting yourself. It’s a very good addition to the overall package.

Assessment Of The Hawk Creek Blade E-VAC

The E-VAC works great for its designed purpose. Thinness and lightweight add to its usability.

Recommendations…

A somewhat thicker handle would give a more comfortable grip for stronger cuts.

Hawk Creek Blade warrants its knives against defects in material and workmanship. For more information contact Hawk Creek Blade Co., www.hawkcreekbladeco.com.

Hawk Creek Blade E-VAC
Knife: E-VAC
Company: Hawk Creek Blade
Knife Pattern: Karambit
Blade Length: 27/8 inches
Blade Material: A2 tool steel
Extras: Includes a coated mild steel trainer for training purposes
Weight: 3 ounces (7 ounces w/sheath)
Overall Length: 5 inches
Sheath: Kydex
MSRP: $135

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D’souza Cerberus Review: Strong Showing Budget Blade

A budget option, the D’souza Cerberus punches above its price point.

Adrian D’souza’s Damned Designs folders are very sturdy and exhibit smooth action. D2 tool steel for the blade and a G-10 handle highlight his Cerberus model. Adrian paid a lot of attention to the handle to make it feel very comfortable during use.

As for how well it performs, well, let’s see.

D’souza’s Damned Deigns Cerberus Initial Test

The Cerberus cruised through the initial test of slicing 20-pound bond paper. It was very aggressive slicing and I had to move my fingers out of the way quickly to keep from nipping them. I used the weight of the knife only for the pull stroke. Cutting the paper was kind of addictive—I just kept rotating it looking for a clean edge to slice.

The Cerberus was very aggressive slicing cardboard.
The Cerberus was very aggressive slicing cardboard.

Moving on to a piece of single-walled cardboard, the Cerberus didn’t slow down a bit—zip, zip, zip on every slice. Again, the hardest part was moving my fingers out of the way fast enough for the next cut. The Cerberus was very aggressive slicing cardboard. The handle was extremely comfy and caused nary a hotspot.

Cerberus Heavy Use Tests

Splitting Wood

I had some leftover fencing slats that work great for kindling. The Cerberus penetrated half to three-quarters of an inch on every chop. With a quick twist of my wrist, the half-inch wood split. The lock stayed 100 percent engaged throughout chopping. The softened handle edges kept my hand comfortable during the hacking as well.

Batoning

To add more pressure to the lock, the author batonned the blade into the kindling eight times. It split the half-inch wood very fast, with the author using only a light tap from the dead-blow hammer. No loosening of the lockup occurred.
To add more pressure to the lock, the author batonned the blade into the kindling eight times. It split the half-inch wood very fast, with the author using only a light tap from the dead-blow hammer. No loosening of the lockup occurred.

To add more pressure to the lock, I batonned the blade eight more times. It split the half-inch wood very fast, using only a light tap from the dead-blow hammer. No loosening of the lockup occurred. Grade: very stout design in the lock department with excellent workmanship.

Whittling Firesticks

I whittled firesticks from some of the split pieces. The Cerberus provided excellent control on the depth of cut. It powered through thicker pieces as well as thin, making some great curly-cues. There were still no hotspots and the edge was hair-popping sharp.

Skiving And Slicing Leather

When the author started cutting the full thickness of the leather, the crunching sound became quite audible. The handle shape aided in controlling skiving and slicing depth.
When the author started cutting the full thickness of the leather, the crunching sound became quite audible. The handle shape aided in controlling skiving and slicing depth.

Moving on to some 8-ounce leather for slicing and skiving, I skived a corner very quickly. I could hear the crunching cuts. It worked quite well, yielding very thin slices of leather. When I started cutting the material full thickness, the crunching sound became quite audible. The handle shape aided in controlling skiving and slicing depth. This puppy is really comfortable to use.

Sisal Rope

I looked for half-inch sisal rope for the final test medium and realized I had only a foot length of it left. Well, it was better than nothing! The challenge was to make short but full rope cuts. Any dullness on the edge would be very easy to detect, as a dull edge would just slide out and over the sisal. After 20 crunching cuts, I had two nicks in my thumbnail. It was time to don Kevlar® gloves. In record Spec Sheet time the Cerberus crunched out 141 cuts in the rope, and I still had my fingertips to boot—an excellent outcome! The blade was not even close to slowing down. (I apologize for the shortage of rope. I have more on order.)

Overall Evaluation Of The Cerberus

The action is smooth and the blade locks up nice and tight.
The action is smooth and the blade locks up nice and tight.

The Cerberus is an excellent folder. The D2 blade has outstanding heat treatment, the handle is very comfortable and lockup is 100 percent secure. I would use it as my EDC.

Potential Changes

I really couldn’t find anything to change. I would recommend that Damned Designs continues to not get too sharp on the handle edges and keep them soft like they are.

Damned Designs warrants its knives to be free of defects. No knife abuse is allowed! For more information contact Adrian D’souza at www.damneddesigns.com, info@damneddesigns.com, and Instagram @damneddesigns.

Cerberus Specs
Company: Damned Designs
Knife Type: Flipper folder
Blade Length: 3.5 inch
Blade Material: D2 tool steel
Blade Thickness At The Thickest: 1/8 inch
Blade Finish: Stonewashed
Handle: G-10
Pocket Clip: Blade tip up
Lock: Linerlock
Liners: Titanium
Weight: 6 ounces
Closed Length: 4.5 inch
MSRP: $49

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Manzano: Appealing Look And Performance

Visually Appealing Thanks To A Distinctive Rasp Pattern On The Blade And Attractive Handle, The Manzano Proves A Sharp Operator.

Old-school knives often have a classic look, and it’s even better when you can tell what the original material or tool was before it was transformed into a blade. When using recycled steel, more time is involved to prep the material for its new life. Can it be hardened, will it forge, will the steel take a polish?

Paul Gonzales did his homework in producing the Manzano Farrier Rasp Blade. There’s no doubt as to what the blade was before it became a knife.

Manzano Farrier Rasp Blade Edge Assessment

To assess the original edge, I sliced 20-pound-bond copy paper. The Manzano performed smoothly, making a zipping noise as it went through the paper. The knife’s weight made the push cuts easy to control.

As a final test, the author checked the edge once again on the copy paper. The Manzano didn’t skip a beat, slicing smoothly.
As a final test, the author checked the edge once again on the copy paper. The Manzano didn’t skip a beat, slicing smoothly.

Heavy Cutting With The Manzano Farrier Rasp Blade

Next up, single-walled cardboard. At the start of the slice, the cardboard parted smoothly. The sliced strips crinkled from the grind bevels as the cut went deeper, maybe due a little bit to the rasp pattern in the steel. The Manzano’s sharp edge cut smoothly.

I used some dense foam left over from my Kydex press for the next test medium. I had great control over the slices using push cuts. The edge easily passed through the foam.

The author used the dead-blow hammer to baton the Manzano through a chunk of 2x10. The knife split the wood in two smacks with no excess shock transferred to the author’s hand, and then produced some nice kindling, too.
The author used the dead-blow hammer to baton the Manzano through a chunk of 2×10. The knife split the wood in two smacks with no excess shock transferred to the author’s hand, and then produced some nice kindling, too.

From there, on to 8-ounce leather. The Manzano was very aggressive skiving the material, producing nice crunching noises on each cut. The mirror-polished blade slid through the leather with ease. Paul did a nice job abrading the steel by the choil so there were no sharp edges where there shouldn’t be.

Firesticks were next. It was very simple to make smooth, fine curly-cues, as well as larger coarse ones. The handle is contoured perfectly for my hand for deeper cuts. The edge performed great while whittling wood.

The author checked the edge for toughness with the antler chop. Twenty hard whacks later and the edge and, therefore, the blade’s heat treatment, passed with flying colors.
The author checked the edge for toughness with the antler chop. Twenty hard whacks later and the edge and, therefore, the blade’s heat treatment, passed with flying colors.

For splitting larger wood I used a chunk of 2×10 and the dead-blow hammer. The Manzano parted the wood in two smacks with no excess shock transferred to my hand. The knife was very comfortable to use in this manner.

It was time for my favorite test material, sisal rope. Positioning half-inch sisal on my cutting board, I started with push cuts. The Manzano crunched its way to 200 cuts with no signs of stopping. That was plenty for my hand. There were no hot spots with the handle and the thumb notches were grippy but not sharp. This is a very comfortable knife to use—or did I already say that?

The Manzano crunched its way to 200 cuts in the half-inch rope with no signs of stopping. There were zero hot spots with the handle and the thumb notches were grippy but not sharp.
The Manzano crunched its way to 200 cuts in the half-inch rope with no signs of stopping. There were zero hot spots with the handle and the thumb notches were grippy but not sharp.

Time to stress the edge and check its toughness with the antler chop. I gave the medium 20 hard whacks, flinging chips all over my work bench. The results? The antler was chopped up and there was no damage to the edge. Kudos on the heat treatment.

Manzano Farrier Rasp Blade Edge Retention

Finally, it was time to return to the 20-pound bond paper. The Manzano didn’t skip a beat, slicing smoothly. I caught the paper with the choil/sharpening notch a few times, tearing it a bit. That was on me.

I Would

Bring the grind up closer to the spine for smoother slicing.

Final Cut

The Manzano is a great performer—classic looking all around and a very comfortable daily user. It’s made to cut.

Paul Gonzales warrants his knives against defects in materials and workmanship as long as the knives have not been abused. For more information contact Gonzales Blades 505-480-7982.

Manzano / Paul Gonzales
Blade Length: 3.25 inches
Blade Material: Farrier’s rasp
Blade Temper: Differential
Handle: Kirinite synthetic
Handle Liners: White G-10
Handle Pins: Nickel silver
Weight: 6 ounces
Overall Length: 7.5 inches
Sheath: Belt pouch design in 8-ounces leather
Weight of Sheathed Knife: 8.5 ounces
Maker’s Price: $200

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Case Marilla: A True Light Heavyweight

The BLADE Magazine 2021 American Made Knife Of The Year®, The Case Marilla More Than Pulls Its Weight.

The BLADE Magazine 2021 American Made Knife Of The Year®, the Marilla from W.R. Case & Sons is a drop-point-blade EDC folder made for slicing and fine work. Aluminum framelock construction and CPM S35VN stainless blade steel result in a lightweight folder that doesn’t weigh your pocket down.

The Marilla opens fluidly via a flipper and closes positively. I really like the fact that the knife does not interfere with your hand when you reach into your pocket. That said, the Marilla must slice and dice to be an effective EDC.

How Sharp Is The Case Marilla

First, I like to do a quick sharpness test with copy paper. In full blade-length slices, the Marilla zipped through the stationery smoothly and with nary a snag. I could have sliced faster if I could have moved my fingers faster. The edge cut in outstanding fashion!

Heavy Cutting With The Marilla

Next up: double-walled cardboard. I used a push cut for a full blade-length slice. The Marilla was very aggressive parting the medium. The handle shape was a plus in controlling cut widths. The minimum curl of the sliced pieces was great.

The Marilla bit very aggressively while skiving a scrap piece of 8-ounce leather. It was very controllable on the thinness of the slices.
The Marilla bit very aggressively while skiving a scrap piece of 8-ounce leather. It was very controllable on the thinness of the slices.

The Marilla bit very aggressively while skiving a scrap piece of 8-ounce leather. I could hear the crunching sound as the blade cut away. It was very controllable on the thinness of the slices and experienced no issues at all.

From there it was on to whittling firesticks. The edge made smooth cuts in the pine with a tight curl in the curly-cue. Thin curly-cues or thick, the Marilla kept the curls clean. The handle was very comfortable while making the deeper cuts, exhibiting no sharp edges in the wrong places to hurt my hand.

Marilla Edge Retention

To test edge holding, I like to use sisal rope. The Marilla crunched to 189 cuts before I felt the edge sliding a bit. Performance: excellent! The thumb notches helped in controlling the cuts. Again, the Marilla handle was comfortable even when I applied hard pressure to it.

Batonning The Marilla

To check the lock, I locked the knife open and batonned the blade into a piece of half-inch pine to make kindling. I hit the blade spine opposite the tip and middle and directly on top of the lock multiple times. The wood split with no problem and the lock stayed tight very well, maintaining 100 percent lockup throughout. There were no blade wobbles or looseness during opening, lockup or closing.

The final hurdle was the antler whack—wrist snapping the blade into an old whitetail deer horn to see if the edge would chip or roll. Thirty whacks later and the edge survived with no damage, indicating excellent heat treatment of the S35VN blade steel.
The final hurdle was the antler whack—wrist snapping the blade into an old whitetail deer horn to see if the edge would chip or roll. Thirty whacks later and the edge survived with no damage, indicating excellent heat treatment of the S35VN blade steel.

The final hurdle was the antler whack—wrist snapping the blade into an old whitetail deer horn to see if the edge would chip or roll. Thirty whacks later and the edge survived with no damage, indicating excellent heat treatment of the S35VN blade steel.

Report On The Case Marilla

The Marilla is an excellent EDC knife. It’s comfortable in the hand as well as the pocket. The blade stays sharp longer than most. It is a great choice for EDC.

I WOULD …

… prefer a hollow blade grind for keener slicing, though such a grind might compromise the blade steel.

As long as its knives are not abused, Case warrants them against defects. For more information, contact Case, attn: F. Feightner, Dept. BL2, 50 Owens Way, Bradford, PA 16701 800-523-6350 or 888-442-1932 CR@caseknives.com, www.wrcase.com.

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